The picture is much more universal. Pi stays

The most obvious
characters that can be compared to these two stories are the Grandmother and
Pi, and the most comfortable comparison that one could make between these two
strong personalities are their fanatical devotion to the theme of religion.
It’s clear that the Grandmother holds right a strict set of Christian beliefs
when she tells the person who just murdered her son and grandkids that he is
“a good man” and consistently saying to the Misfit that Jesus will
save him. Even unto her death, she was continually saying Jesus’s name
throughout the ordeal. Pi also seems to follow a strict code of rituals as he
continues to practice his religions through his journey. The author even
describes how Pi came to exercise all of them, further giving detail into Pi’s
life as a whole and almost giving the reader a reason to empathize with his
insane practice of three religions. Even on the life raft with a dangerous
tiger in his presence every day, he continues to consistently follow most of
the rituals of each religion with fervor, unless he is unable to physically
perform them. Another comparison that could be made between Pi and the
Grandmother is their views on the world. The grandmother’s view of the world is
a very close-minded one, Whereas Pi’s picture is much more universal.

Pi stays devoted to the
analysis of God. Evidently, he has got a belief in each religion although he
does not safeguard their particular doctrines jealously. Pi tells a rich
parable whereby, each time milkmaids attempt to own Krishna he vanishes.
Similarly, every time religious faith tries to claim exclusive ownership of
God, right religion escapes. Every story discloses some of Pi’s workings multifaceted
religious beliefs. It may be shocking on how a person could entirely hold
Hindu, Christian and Muslim faiths at once. But the answer that Pi gives is
that, this can be done without having any trace of jealousy.Martel (55)
Religious beliefs as well as stories are connected to Pi’s life since Pi claims
that each of them needs faith on the listener’s part. But what is surprising
about Pi as being a religious boy is that he admires nonbelievers.  What is essential according to Pi is
believing in something and Pi may appreciate the ability of an atheist in
finding in the absence of God and not having a concrete proof of that
particular absence. For Pi, agnostics who do not make a step of faith in either
of the directions are similar to listeners who don’t appreciate the non-literal
truth which an imaginary story may provide.

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