PROGRAMMING Director Ministry of Child and Youth Services

PROGRAMMING FOR YOUTH

A FORMAL PROPOSAL

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by

 

 

Alysha Sloan

The Raft

 

 

Submitted to

 

 

Ministry of Children & Youth
Services

 

 

 

 

Record Date of Submission

5 January, 2017

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Table of
Contents                                                                                                    Page
1

Letter of Transmittal                                                                                                  Page1

Introduction
                                                                                                             Page
1

            Highlight                                                                                                         Page
1          

Research                                                                                                                   Page
2

Goals                                                                                                                          Page
3

Project
Description                                                                                                   Page
4

Project
Timeline                                                                                                         Page
5

Budget                                                                                                                      Page
6

            Breakdown                                                                                                    Page
6

Staff
Information                                                                                                       Page
7

Conclusion                                                                                                                Page
8

 

17
Centre Street

St.
Catharine’s, ON

L2T
4W9

 

December
20, 2017

 

Ms.
Vivienne Stormson

Director

Ministry
of Child and Youth Services

83
Ainsworth Boulevard

St.
Catharines, ON

L6V
9T0

 

Dear
Ms. Stormson:

 

Please
find attached my formal report entitled “Programming for Youth”.  As requested, the report discusses the
enrichment of life for homeless youth living at a shelter by providing
life-skill sessions, recreational activity, cooking courses and professional
courses.  The report was designed for the
consumers at The Raft and if you approve, the contents can be used to implement
various programs within the organization.

This
research-based report highlights the quality of life for homeless youth and
focuses on the social benefits of implementing structured lessons which
implement life skills and other important qualities to move into adulthood. The
report also provides information regarding the goals, timeline, budget and
other important variables to take into consideration.

Most
importantly, I hope this report offers youth the ability to utilize their time
effectively and build a better quality of life. As well, I hope this
information encourages high risk youth to motivate themselves and construct
themselves into efficient people while transitioning into adulthood.

Yours
truly,

 

 

Alysha
Sloan

Social
Service Worker

The
Raft

1      
Introduction

 

I am writing in regard to the request
for proposal from the Ministry of Children and Youth Services. The closing date
for this request is Wednesday, December 6th, 2017.  This request is for a $10,000 grant that is
to be used for enrichment of adolescents leaving care through development of
healthy life skills.

1.1      Highlight

 

The Raft is a non-profit emergency
shelter for youth between the ages of 16-24. It currently has no programming
that fulfills the standards of the Ministry of Children and Youth Services. The
Raft currently offers a lack of services at the shelter that provide a good
start in life, accessing the development of youth and offering programming to
youth that encourages them to become productive adults. The Raft is in need of
funding to develop and implement programming to teach healthy life skills. It
has been stated, that new research suggests participating in physical activity
and sports may be one way to help defeat homelessness. (Magee, 2011). In
effort, The Raft encourages and seeks to receive funding on behalf of the youth
to provide them with the best opportunity to succeed and reach their potential.

The goal of this proposal is to
highlight the importance of recreational activity for youth however, below is
in-depth information regarding the deliverables of this proposal. This includes
the project goals, funding, and other important areas of the project.

The research behind this study has
been collected through journal articles and different organizations that
recognize the importance of recreational activity.

2      
Research

 

Homelessness is often an issue among
youth. It is characterized by youth who experience dysfunctional home
environments and poverty, often leading to food and shelter not being up to proper
living standards (Aviles & Helfrich, 2004). Homeless individuals are more
likely to have higher burnout and fatigue; this causes them to have more
failures than successes in their lives and creates difficulty to apply
themselves into the community (Belcher, 1988). As Gourley states (as cited in
Aviles & Helfrich, 2004), life skills are an important aspect in a youth’s
life to become self-sufficient and functional. As Okkema explains (as cited in
Aviles & Helfrich, 2004), life skills involve daily living activities
(dressing, grooming, bathing), instrumental activities of daily living (meal
preparation, money management, cleaning) and community skills (using
transportation, social interaction).

Mannel and Kleiber (as cited in Lemonia,
Goulimaris & Gerogios, 2017) states that “it is important for every society
to improve the quality of life of children and adolescents. Participating in
recreational activities helps children and adolescents to ameliorate their
quality of life, because they offer physical, psychological and social
benefits.” This statement explains the importance of bettering the quality of
life for youth.

3      
Goals

 

The goal of
the recreational programming is to enable at risk youth who are homeless, have
mental health issues and addiction problems to improve the skills needed in
life to transition into adulthood successfully and effectively.

According
to Palepu, Hubley, Russell, Gaddermann and Chinni’s research, studies have
shown that people who suffer from homelessness mentioned the importance of
having recreational activity, as it is rewarding and gives them a break from
street life. (Palepu, Hubley, Russell, Gadermann, & Chinni,
2012)

The main objectives
include:

1.     Providing recreational activity. The
objective is that the youth will maintain a better quality of life, that will
enrich and motivate them to continue being active throughout adulthood.

2.     Enabling the youth to make better
choices, such as attending the classes instead of getting high.

3.      Providing the youth with healthy meals that
will improve their nutrition and help develop cooking skills.

4.     Offer youth accessibility to
programs that are offered throughout the community, so they can engage with
their peers and build communication/life skills.

4      
Project
Description

 

Programming will occur at the Raft where at risk youth live.
This also includes offering the services to youth who may have some stable
housing however, use the drop-in services occasionally to utilize other
programs offered at the organization. At times, it is often noticed by staff
members that youth cause disruption in other arears of the community such as
the library and other public areas. Staff/volunteers will provide hourly
programming once a week to offer these youth times to pose as less of a risk to
others in the community during a 12-month timeline.

Effective programming will be set in place to meet the
clientele’s needs. This will mirror other recreation/life skill programs that
are offered through other organizations such as the YMCA however, this program
will be customized to relate to street youth. Each session will be planned out
effectively to provide the most effective basis of teaching and learning prior
to the session. Each week will consist of a different life skill topic,
recreational activity, cooking session and a hired professional (See appendix A). This will
create cohesion with the shelter youth and provide them time to participate in
activities that street youth do not get the opportunity to partake in.

As discussed above, each week will have a different
goal/lesson directed to a specific subject.


(Week 1) Life skill sessions:

Ø 
To provide youth with information that can be
applied to their daily life.

§ 
Engages and teaches communication lessons during
discussions

§ 
Sessions will be about relevant subjects such
as; stress management, self-awareness, mindfulness, cleaning, money management,
etc.
 


(Week 2) Recreational activity:

Ø 
  To
provide the youth with a better quality of life.

§ 
Will build teamwork skills, which can be applied
in employment and other aspects of life

§ 
Better the mental health of homeless youth

§ 
Motivate youth to become physically active


(Week 3) Cooking session:

Ø 
To provide youth with nutritious meals and
recipes.

§ 
Practices time management skills when preparing
meals

§ 
Offers nutritious meals to homeless youth

§ 
Prepares youth for adulthood and for those who
will be living on their own


(Week 4) Hiring a professional:

Ø 
To provide street youth the opportunity to
experience community based programs.

§ 
Educates youth on specialized areas

§ 
Makes street youth inclusive of the community

Outreach
workers will be familiar with the clients and access the improvement of
the youth throughout the duration of programming through a survey which
determines the current needs and effectiveness of the program. (Survey outline sample for
improvement, in appendix.) Volunteers will be instructed to follow the given outline to facilitate
the lessons and report to the staff
on duty if there are any issues, or ideas that are discovered during the
sessions. It is the main
director’s duty to assure the equipment, professionals and food are
picked up and scheduled at the given times.

5      
 Project
Timeline

 

Description of Work

Start and End Dates

Phase 1/Week 1
 

·      Hire
volunteers for each week to facilitate the groups
 
·      Purchase
the equipment for Recreation Days
 

January
1-15

Phase 2/Week 2

·      Discuss
activities with the volunteers and questions they may have regarding the
program
 
·      Train them
on how to properly facilitate a group
 

January
16-31

Phase 3/Week 3

·      Notify
clientele of the programming
 
·      Create
posters and present them in the shelter
 

February 1
(on going)

Phase 4/Week4

·      Begin the
program
 

March 1
(on going)

 

 

 

 

6      
Budget

Description
of Work

Anticipated
Costs

-Find a
volunteer/volunteers to run programming


FREE

-Purchase equipment for recreational
activities, this may include; soccer balls, basketballs, yoga mats, Wii, Just
Dance video game, etc.
 


$2500
 

– Purchase
nutritional food and snacks.


$2000

– Extra
recreation money that may be used to hire an instructor (yoga instructor,
karate, etc.)
 


$4000

– Extra
Expenses such as; repairs, lost/stolen items, toiletries, extra activities,
etc.


$1500

Total Amount:

Ø  Equipment=
$2500
Ø  Nutrition=
$2000
Ø  Extra
Recreation= $4000
Ø  Extra
Expenses= $1500
 
2500+2000+4000+1500=
$10,000

 

 

6.1     
Breakdown

The budget consists of various sections to provide the
various weekly activities the best advantage for success.

Ø 
Each month, one cooking class will consist of a
$166 budget for meals. Donated food can also be utilized during meals and cooking
times.
 

Ø 
Along with an approximate $333 budget once a
month used towards extra recreation such as a yoga instructor, a cooking
instructor, etc.

Ø 
$2500 will be used for any equipment that is
needed and requested by youth/facilitators to sustain the most enjoyable time
for the youth. This may include; yoga mats, sports equipment, etc.

Ø 
Extra expenses will be included with a $1500
budget for any extra costs that may appear such as; repairs, utensils, extra
activities, etc.

The budget will be maintained by the main director, who will
manage the budget within Excel. The director will apply the budget when and
where it is needed each month.

7      
Staff Information

 

Kyle MacIntyre, Main Director, carries a Bachelor’s Degree
in Social Work from the University of Waterloo. Kyle MacIntrye has an extensive
amount of experience working with high risk youth that suffer from episodic and
chronic homelessness, mental illnesses and addictions. His strengths are shown
when working with the youth, technology and communicating with other coworkers.
His responsibility is to ensure the weekly activities are up to The Rafts
standards, while maintaining the budget and purchasing the necessary equipment.

Heather Red, Outreach Worker, holds a Social Service Worker
diploma from Niagara College. Heather Red has been working closely with the
youth for many years. She builds professional relationships with the youth and
helps engage them in the social services that are offered at The Raft and
throughout the area. As the outreach worker, her responsibility will be to
continue working closely with the youth and ask them for suggestions to better
the program through a survey that is offered to the youth. (Survey outline sample for
improvement, in appendix.)

Ryan Kellog, Youth Worker and Supervisor, holds a Child and
Youth Worker diploma from Niagara College. Ryan Kellog is in charge of locating
current/previous/new volunteers and placement students. He will also be
training the volunteers on how to properly facilitate a group.

Other staff on duty are also responsible to support the
programs and will be directed to do tasks for the programs on request by Ryan
Kellog. These requests will be documented in the shift change book and will
indicate any tasks that will need assistance.

Volunteers and placement students from local high schools,
colleges and universities will be the main facilitators of the groups. Current
university and college students are committed to 2 to 4 days a week as a
mandated placement policy within their school. These student placements are
usually over a 4-8-month period with commitment.  

As a youth emergency shelter, teamwork is strongly
recommended throughout the organization as it presents a positive and
empowering environment. To ensure the capacity and sustainability of the
program, teamwork will be looked upon and supported.

8      
Conclusion

 

The problem of a low quality of life in youth’s lives can be
eliminated. To provide the best solution to a lack of proper necessities, it
will take time, money and help from workers and the community. Organized
programming at the youth shelter, such as: cooking courses, sport teams,
recreational activities, art, and life skill building would help engage the
youth in moving forward into a more positive adulthood.  More recreational activity opportunities for
teens who do not have access to the proper equipment, would encourage them to
be off the streets and be productive. Cooking courses would allow the youth to
gain expertise on nutritious meals, while implementing healthy choices and
gaining cooking experience. If this program can be implemented, there will be a
very likely increase in the quality of life in youth at the shelter, as well as
less drug activity on the streets.

On behalf of the youth at The Raft, I am kindly seeking the approval
of this proposal to provide youth with the standards of life that lower-risk
people experience as daily activities.

You
can contact me, Alysha Sloan at

Alysha
Sloan

Social
Service Worker

The
Raft

(905)
931 4402

 

Recipient Signature:

____________________________________

 

Date of approval:

____________________________________

 

 

 

Bibliography

Aviles, A. H. (2004). Life skill service needs:
Perspectives of homeless youth. Retrieved from
https://login.proxy.library.niagarac.on.ca/login?url=https://search-proquest-com.proxy.library.niagarac.on.ca/docview/204647221?accountid=39476
Belcher, J. R. (1988). The relationship between the
deinstitutionalization model, psychiatric disability, and homelessness. Health
& Social Work, 13, 145-153.
Lemonia, D. G. (2017). Social skills and prediction
of the quality of life of adolescents. the case of dance and physical
activities. Journal of Physical Education and Sport, 1(17), 502-508.
Magee, J. (2011). Disengagement, de-motivation,
vulnerable groups and sporting inclusion: A case study of the Homeless World
Cup. Soccer & Society, 12, 159-173.
Palepu, A., Hubley, A. M., Russell, L. B.,
Gadermann, A. M., & Chinni, M. (2012, 8 15). Health and Quality of
Life Outcomes. Retrieved from biomedcentral:
https://hqlo.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1477-7525-10-93
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix A

This is a graph that indicates the monthly outline for  

MONTH OF MARCH 2018

DATE/SESSION

ACTIVITY

EQUIPMENT NEEDED

Monday March 5, 2018
·     
Life Skill Session 1

·     
Money Management session

o  
Fake money
o  
Calculator
o  
Pen & Paper
 

Monday March 12, 2018
·     
Recreational Activity Session 1

·      
Chuck the Chicken

o   Rubber
chicken
o   2
groups of even numbered people
 

Monday March 19, 2018
·      
Cooking Lesson 1

·      
Salad

o  
Lettuce
o  
Tomato
o  
Cheese
o  
Olive
o  
Cucumber
o  
Peppers
o  
Sauce
 

Monday March 26, 2018
·      
Professional

·      
Yoga Session

o   Yoga
Mats or Towels
o   Water
bottles
o   CD
player
 

 

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