In to help her patients to the best

In the second half of Never Let Me Go, by Ishiguro Kazo, readers are able to see how Kathy changes as she grows up. For example, she becomes much more determined and sticks to what she says. She explains, “It wasn’t long after I made my decision, and once I’d made it, I never wavered. I just got up one morning and told Keffers I wanted to start my training to become a carer” (202). Kathy is annoyed at Ruth for forgetting incidents at Hailsham and telling her that Tommy would never love her. She instantly decides to start her carer training, and never thinks twice about changing her mind. As Kathy becomes older, she stays very caring and compassionate. In the beginning of the novel, she cares for Tommy, and helps him with his anger issues, when nobody else will. As a carer, Kathy is still very caring and puts her patient’s needs before herself. She says, “I don’t claim I’ve been immune to all of this, but I’ve learnt to live with it. Some carers, though, their whole attitude lets them down…It really gets to me too, the way so many of them ‘shrink’ the moment they step inside a hospital. They don’t know what to say to the white coats; they can’t make themselves speak up on behalf of their donor” (208). She learns to live with the constant reminder of becoming a donor, in order to help her patients to the best of her abilities.Ruth changes as well, in the second half of the novel, after she becomes a donor. Instead of fighting back, when Kathy and Tommy oppose what she was saying, she just stands there and accepts it. Kathy explains, “It wasn’t simply that we had ganged up on Ruth: it was the way she’d just taken it. In the old days, it was inconceivable she’d have let something like that happen without striking back” (223). As Ruth’s body becomes weaker, due to donations, so does her mind. She does not have the strength to say something cunning, or fight back. She also has grown up and realizes that it okay and not worth it to make a bigger issue. Ruth also feels guilty for keeping Kathy and Tommy from having a relationship. She says, “But I kept you too apart…What I want is to put it right. Put it right for what I messed up for you” (232-233). Ruth feels immense guilt for holding Tommy and Kathy back, and gives them the idea of getting a deferral, so they can spend some time together before completing. She even goes out of her way to find Madame’s address, in order for Kathy and Tommy to ask for a deferral.?Over the course of the novel, Tommy becomes very hopeful. He creates a plan to use his animal drawings to get a deferral, first for Ruth, and then for Kathy. That way, they could live a happy life together for a few years before completing. Tommy was never good at art, so at the cottages he improves his skills by drawing very intricate animals, to impress Madame. “The thing is, I’m doing them really small. Tiny. I’d never thought of that at Hailsham. I think maybe that’s where I went wrong” (178). However, this hopefulness and belief, causes him to be heartbroken and disappointed when hefinds out that deferrals are not real. Tommy gets really angry, just as he would when he was a child at Hailsham. Kathy says, “The moon wasn’t quite full, but it was bright enough, and I could make out in the mid-distance, near where the field began to fall away, Tommy’s figure, raging, shouting, flinging his fists and kicking about” (274). This shows how upset and angry he was, as he had not been really angry like that in years. ?The theme of identity and figuring out who you are, is evident in the second half of Never Let Me Go. Finding your possible isimportant to the clones, as they are able to see who they actually are.After realizing that Ruth’s possible is definitely not who she was cloned from, she gets really upset. She says, “We’re modeled from trash. Junkies, prostitutes, winos, tramps. Convicts, maybe, just as long as they aren’t psychos… If you want to look for possibles, if you want to do it properly, then you look in the gutter” (166). Ruth believes that they were all copied from bad people, as they would be the only ones willing to be cloned. This shows that Ruth does not see herself as a nice woman working in an office anymore, becauseshe sees herself as trash. The theme of identity is also evident when Kathy and Tommy are speaking with Madame and Miss Emily at the end of the novel. Miss Emily explains that they collected the children’s art at Hailsham to prove that they have identities, in order to give them a better life. She says, “We took your art because we thought it would reveal your souls. Or to put it more finely, we did it to prove you had souls at all” (260). By proving that clones had souls, Miss Emily and Madame were able to provide them with something other clones were not receiving; an education and a happy childhood.?Another theme portrayed in this novel is the importance of friendship. Since these children are clones, they only have themselves to confide in and rely on. In the beginning of the novel, Kathy, Ruth and Tommy are close friends. After Kathy starts her training to become a carer, they start to drift apart. When Kathy becomes Ruth’s carer, Ruth convinces her to go see an abandoned boat, near Tommy’s centre. Kathy explains, “Ruth kept bringing it up, and our plans somehow grew firmer, until in the end, I sent a message to Tommy’s carer…” (217). Ruth wants her and Kathy to meet up with Tommy, so she can mend their relationship, as she was the one to ruin it. When Kathy and Ruth meet Tommy for the first time in years, they still seem very close. Even though they still bicker and choose sides, they always help each other out. Kathy explains, “Tommy and I, we remembered what had happened in the car, when we’d more or less ganged up on her. And almost as an instinct, we both went to her. I took an arm, Tommy supported her elbow on the other side, and we began gently guiding her towards the fence” (222-223). This shows how strong the bonds are between these three friends, and how they will always be there for each other, no matter what.?I can connect the way adults feel about children in Never Let Me Go, to the novel The Darkest Minds, by Alexandra Bracken. InThe Darkest Minds, a deadly disease has killed most of the children in America, and the ones that survived have special powers, such as pyrokinesis and telekinesis. The adults living in America are afraid of these children, and put them into internment camps, to keep themselves safe. In Never Let Me Go the guardians and teachers were afraid of the clones at Hailsham. Miss Emily says, “We’re all afraid of you. I myself had to fight back my dread of you almost every day I was as Hailsham” (269). The adults are afraid of the clones, because they are different, just as the adults in The Darkest Minds were afraid of the children with powers.?I can also connect the theme of friendship in Never Let Me Go, and The Darkest Minds. In The Darkest Minds, the children have to create strong friendship bonds, as they only have each other to rely on, in the internment camps. For example, the main character Ruby has three friends. They always trust each other, and help each otherout, no matter what. Never Let Me Go is very similar, in the sense that the clones have no families, and can only confide in each other.Even though Kathy, Tommy and Ruth have ups and downs, they have close bonds, and their friendship is very important to them. In both novels, the main characters are missing their families, which intensifies their friendships.?A symbol in the second half of Never Let Me Go, is the beached boat that Kathy, Tommy and Ruth go see. A boat is usually a symbol of freedom, however, in this novel, it symbolizes the lack of freedom, as it is beached and unable to move. This connects to Kathy, Tommy and Ruth, as their futures are already decided for them, and they do not have the freedom to choose. In addition, the boat and the marshes surrounding the boat foreshadow the future for these three friends. Kathy says, “…You could see here and there ghostly dead tree trunks poking out of the soil, most of them broken off only a few feet up” (224). These dead tree trunks foreshadow the inevitable deaths of Ruth, Tommy and eventually Kathy. Another symbol in this novel is Hailsham. Hailsham represents innocence. The children at Hailsham were very innocent, and did not know anything about what the future has in store for them. Miss Emily says, “But we sheltered you during those years, and we gave you your childhoods” (268). Hailsham used as a way to preserve the innocence of the clones as long as possible. After leaving Hailsham, their innocence was destroyed, as they learned more about being a carer and a donor.

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