Aristotle can have infinite interpretations. The law Aristotle

Aristotle once famously stated, “The law is reason free from passion”. Aristotle may have been a great man and philosopher, but I cannot agree with this statement. The legal field is an area where debate is encouraged, and the “reason” Aristotle speaks of can have infinite interpretations. The law Aristotle speaks of bores me, but the current legal climate is an area I am extremely eager to enter. Today, many attorneys are corrupt and have followed money instead of justice, but this makes me more excited to become an attorney and fight the corruption. Currently, the most intriguing area of law to me is medical malpractice. This passion stems from my desire to help give a voice to the voiceless. I have spent hours of free time researching the area of medical malpractice, and have discovered there are too many instances where victims of malpractice fail to hold the medical system they put their trust in accountable. A recent Johns Hopkins Study has suggested that “a surgeon in the United States leaves a foreign object such as a sponge or a towel inside a patient’s body after an operation 39 times a week, performs the wrong procedure on a patient 20 times a week and operates on the wrong body site 20 times a week”. These statistics are alarming; but what is even more alarming is this: in the same study, researchers claimed that 97 percent of valid claims of malpractice are never pursued in the courtroom. This dilemma is not just about getting victims money (to which they are properly entitled), it is also about holding doctors accountable and ensuring the safety of future patients. The other area of law I am intrigued in is tort law, which is very similar to malpractice law in the sense that I desire to represent someone who has suffered the loss at the hand of another. I am passionate about tort law for a multitude of reasons, but I believe that Liebeck v Mcdonald’s Restaurants is a case that perfectly highlights the importance of tort law. While McDonald’s has succeeded in making the infamous “Coffee Case” seem frivolous, justice was served when Stella Liebeck, a 79 year-old woman was awarded $640,000 in damages. Stella suffered third degree burns from spilling excessively hot coffee, and even had to undergo skin grafting from the spill. Throughout the trial, Stella admitted the coffee spill was her fault, but the 190 degree coffee that caused her to obtain her burns in only seven seconds was not. ┬áCases like these are incredibly important and hold companies accountable for their actions. I am heavily inspired by Stella’s decision to face a multi-billion dollar company to get the money she needed to afford her medical treatments, and when I finish my schooling, I want to go right into representing people like her, and if I have to represent someone pro-bono, I hope I have enough money and time so that I can focus on ensuring justice. While the legal field is extremely highly reason-based, I truly believe that the driving passion that myself and my peers face for the law will be enough to establish a system that listens to all those who have suffered from the mistakes of others justly to ensure a judicial system of honesty.

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